In an exclusive interview, the Chelsea forward opens up on equality in football and the time the Danish women’s team took on their own federation

When Pernille Harder wanted to see the benchmark for progression from hometown prospect to international star, there was only one place to look. Her potential was in little doubt by the mid-2000s but it was only when the YouTube era dawned, during her teens, that she could glimpse her future self. “It was difficult to find any women’s football on TV so the only thing I did was go online and watch clips of Marta,” she says. “She was the biggest player I knew – my idol.”

Now millions of girls can say the same about Harder, whose world-record move to Chelsea in September has put her in a position of rare influence. But she delights in the idea that nobody needs to look up only to her: that the sport has come far enough for hopefuls to take their pick from an increasingly prominent set of high-profile faces where previously few were visible.

Continue reading…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *